Kicking Breast Cancer's Butt

drains

 

My reconstruction, Phase II surgery, was pretty non-traumatic, compared to the Phase I surgery.  Phase II was a little fat grafting, and a tiny bit of reduction, so no drains necessary.

What I didn’t know, is that approximately 10% of patients have drainage issues in what is known as the T junction.  The sort of lollipop shaped incision that encompasses the areola in a circle, and a straight line or lollipop stick that goes down the middle of the breast under the areola.  This part of the incision, under the areola, sometimes separates a little, and blood and fluid drain out.  Not uncommon, but not so common that the possibility was included in my aftercare packet.  When it first started happening to me, it was like a clot or a scab had fallen out, not really bleeding, but it smudged up my clothes.  Still, I freaked out and called the resident on call, since it was after clinic hours, and left word for him or her to call me back.  Reading my aftercare packet again in the 4 minutes it took to for him (for it was a him), I noticed the literature does say some oozing or drainage may occur.  So I felt a little silly by the time the resident called back, but told him what I was seeing anyway.  He asked me the standard questions to determine if any infection was present – temperature of 100 or more, does the tissue seem hot, is the tissue red at all – then told me to cover it with a dressing to keep it from ruining my clothes, otherwise there was nothing to worry about.  Okay, fine.  So I taped a maxi pad to my chest (it’s in the literature, I’m not kidding) since I didn’t have any surgical gauze, and went back to watching “Castle” with my husband.

Everything is all fine and well, until the next night.  Whoa!  What the hell is this?  We’ve gone from a slight ooze to a full-on drip.  The fluid is so dark, it almost looks purple.  Hmm.  Consulting my aftercare packet again, I see a phrase that goes something like “during the healing process, bruises may liquefy, and the fluid may seek a way out through the surgical site” or something to that effect.  Still, I called the resident on call, for it was again after clinic hours.  We again went through infection detection questions – no fever, redness, etc.  Then he told me that sometimes, not often, but maybe about 10% of patients, something comes loose, and while it’s nothing to worry about, he suggested I wear a bra to support the breast, in order to ease the tension on the surgical site, and call the clinic in the morning, to find out if they’d like to see me before my regularly scheduled appointment on Thursday.

So I again was mostly reassured, and went to bed able to sleep that night, not worrying about major surgical malfunctions.

The next morning I called my clinic, and spoke to my surgeon’s primary nurse.  I told her what was happening, and what the previous night’s on-call resident had to say about the tension on my incision, and how something may have come loose.  She poured scorn on that idea, and told me how she felt this was all normal.  She told me to continue keeping the dressing on the site, and they would see me at my regularly scheduled appointment, which was the next day anyway.

At the appointment with the surgeon, her primary resident, and a student, they packed gauze strip wound dressing into the hole in my breast, and taught my husband how to do it at home.  No big deal, he’s used to getting the gross aftercare jobs whenever I have surgery, so obviously he’s the man for the job.

Well, Thursday night we removed the dressing and tape from the site, and pulled the packing gauze out of the wound.  I’m not looking – because there’s $hit coming out of a big, gaping hole in my boob!  Yuck!

First we tried standing in the bathroom to change the dressing.  That didn’t work, so we decided that the best thing to do was for me to lay down, as I had done at the doctor’s office.  No dice, we still couldn’t find where the gauze strip packing was supposed to go in (the doctor made it look SO easy).  So we gave up that night, just covered it with surgical dressing, and went to bed.  My husband was ready to try again in the morning, but I vetoed that idea.  He was so tentative when he’d tried it the first night that I didn’t allow him to try again.

Back to the doctor we go the following week, and we have to make our confession – or I did, anyway – that we never did do the packing of the wound as we had been instructed.  I was adamant that if anyone was going to do the packing, it was going to be me.  I don’t often dig my heels in, but when I do, you’d best just stand aside and let me have my way.  Fortunately, Ken is a bright man, and apparently so are my doctor and the doctor’s resident.  So Dr. Colohan’s clinic nurse came in to give me the tutorial on packing a wound, and a new bottle of gauze strip tape.  After the first few days, I have to say I’m getting better at it.  The first couple of times, I think it took five attempts to reach success, and I still don’t believe I was packing as much tape into the wound.

Now, several days later, I’m packing like a champ.  And packing more and more into the wound, it seems.  And still soaking the maxi pads I’ve been taping to my chest.  Plus it smells like old blood, and I’m passing clots.  Ugh.  I was joking with Ken last night, and said it’s like my boob is having a period.  He laughed out loud, and said “If you haven’t used it already, that’s a great title for a blog post.”  Which I didn’t use, but still, here we are talking about it.

Last night I had said that at least I wasn’t having cramps with my boob-period, but this morning I’m getting these twinges, that I am assuming are the clots passing, so in a way my boob is having cramps to go along with its period.  And it’s the Mother of all periods, because it’s a rather heavy flow, and it never seems to end.  And it’s all normal.  Awesome.

I was doing some research last night, and based on what I’m reading about other patient’s experience, it seems like it gets worse before it gets a lot better, which is where I seem to be.  And totally normal for the exudate (ha!  That’s a medical type word, it means the stuff that comes out of a wound) to smell kind of yucky.  Not completely foul, as that along with a higher than normal temperature and redness of the breast, means infection.  But it’s totally normal for a wound to smell rusty, musty, or like old blood, which is how mine smells.  Ew.  As unpleasant as that sounds, I found that rather reassuring.  I was worried that something was going horribly wrong, but it turns out this is all normal, and possibly even a sign that soon things will get better.

Lord, have mercy, I certainly hope that is true.

It’s been a while since I last gave you all an update.  I guess that’s good in some ways, as it means I’m not focused on the next phase of my treatment/surgery/recovery, and more focused on living my life.  Because, Surprise!  There is life after breast cancer, and you’ve got to go out on live it.  What else are you going to do, but move on forward?  I certainly am.

My range of movement in my right arm is not back to 100%, but hey, it doesn’t hurt to bend, load the dishwasher, or fold laundry.  So my house is sort of/semi clean, for the moment.

My hair is long enough to color, and long enough to cut into some kind of style – which I finally did!  No more chemo curls, no more gray.   I’m now a super dark brunette with a mean blonde streak, with a short, Pin-Up Girl style bob cut.  Whoo, hoo!  I think of it as the kind of hair I have to live up to, now that I have the energy (and the eyelashes) to make an effort to look like a girl, instead of a patient.  What a difference a year makes…

I have two breasts now, as you know, and mostly look normal under my clothes.  It is obvious to me that I’m not exactly symmetrical, in some of the tops that I own, but I like to think that most people wouldn’t notice, if they didn’t look too closely.

My phase II is next month, where Dr. Neligan will reduce and lift my left breast, and do some fat grafting on the right.  Hopefully this will result in both breasts appearing to have the same size and shape.  I have been looking forward to this, for the most part.  Still a longer surgery, but a shorter hospital stay.  Overnight, at most.  I also don’t expect to hurt as much as I did after the phase I, where I had two surgical sites.  This time it’s only one (well, one and a half), and it sort of feels like familiar territory.  I feel like after the phase I, phase II will be a piece of cake, relatively speaking.

Then I happened to be looking at one of the discussion boards on the breastcancer.org website, and read a post written by one of my sister flapper’s phase II, wherein she mentioned she has two drains.  Head slap!  Crap.  I’m going to have drains again.  Don’t get me wrong, I am grateful they have such a thing, as they give the fluid trying to fill the vacuum left by the surgery a place to go, until such time as the tissue heals itself.  But they are also kind of like having an extra appendage.  Three hands SOUNDS like a good idea when you’re wrangling kids or pots on the stove – but more often than not, you find it gets in your way when you’re trying to go about your usual activities.  You have to make allowances for it, you see.  More clearance when using the bathroom or getting dressed.  Always worrying about where it is when you’re taking a shower, hoping you don’t catch it on something.  I guess an extra hand you could get used to, but the drain you hope you never have to get used to!

I had two drains after my mastectomy, and one after the DIEP flap reconstruction (I was lucky; some women get three, or even four!).  I don’t know what to expect after my Phase II.  For some reason I keep focusing on the left breast, always forgetting my right breast will be getting some “tweaks” as well.  And where exactly are they getting the fat, for the above mentioned fat grafting?  And will those “harvest sites” need drains, too?  I think I’m going to stop thinking about this now….

Hopefully my recovery will continue, and after the Phase II I’ll be done with surgery and anesthesia for the year.  I’m behind the mental schedule I set for myself in February of 2013.  I honestly believed I’d be complete with everything in one year.  Surgery, treatment, reconstruction, recovery, and back to my old self like I was before breast cancer happened to me.  Ha!  I forgot, I had Stage 3 breast cancer, and aggressive treatment for 10 months, plus recovery time before I could even schedule reconstruction.  I’ve been doing this for a while, and still I find myself saying “Well, this is the hard part.  After this it will be easier.”  As I’ve mentioned before – it’s never easier, it’s just different.

I’ll have a couple more procedures after this Phase II, but nothing like the last three surgeries, or the chemo, or the radiation.  Really just cosmetic stuff, but still part of the process.  And I’m sure I’ll be thinking then “Oh, I’ve already been through the hard part, this next part will be easier.”  And I’m sure I’ll be just as amazed to discover yet again - it’s not any easier, it’s just different.