Kicking Breast Cancer's Butt

recovery

Chemo ages you.

I’m convinced of that.

Just over one year ago I was walking a mile every day to work, and sometimes another mile between offices during the day.

Yesterday, I had done one load of laundry, one load of dishes, made lunch for Michaela and Ken, and then lunch and tea for myself, and after than my legs were heavy and my feet were in pain.

It amazes me to think that a mere 14 years ago I was stomping all over London and the British countryside for 10 weeks, and I was rarely as tired as I am right now.

Grieving what was

I’m grieving today.  Grieving for the young woman I once was.  I didn’t appreciate what I had at the time.  I guess everyone wants what they don’t have, somehow believing it better than what they do have.  I regretted my large pores, my broad forehead, my prominent chin.

Like most women, I tried in vain to shrink my pores.

For a long time, I wore my hair long, and kept it pulled back from my face, even as I looked at my reflection in disgust, considering my giant forehead.

And I actually considered plastic surgery to “dock” my out-there chin.

Fool.  Looking back at photos of myself at 25, all that I see is how beautiful I looked.  All twenty-somethings are beautiful.  They can’t help it.  You’re young, your skin is taut, and dark circles under your eyes just make you more fascinating.  It means you have an interesting life, outside of your work life.  You roll out of bed, messy hair and rumpled clothes, and last night’s makeup.  You look gorgeous.  You don’t believe me now, but when you’re 40, look back at pictures of yourself at this age, and you’ll see I was right.

I look back at the image the 25-year-old that I was, and I grieve for what has been lost.  The youthful outlook, the anything-could-happen-so-everything-wonderful-is-yet-possible mind set.

I’m no longer that young woman, with the quick, light step.  I still believe anything is possible, and I will always believe in hope.  But I have to hold onto that based on faith – I don’t have the energy I once had, and I sure don’t have the physical resilience I once had.  And now I accept the fact that I am mortal.  I don’t think I fully believed in death and mortality when I was in my 20’s.  It seemed so far away, as to seem like only a story.  Yes, that happens to some people.  But not to me.

But today, I am disabled.  At least for the foreseeable future.  That is a hard truth to come up against.  I am not what I once was.  And I never will be.

I am strong.  I am powerful.  But I now walk with a shuffle and a little bit of a limp.  I walk like an old woman.

In my mind, I see the image of who I was 25 years ago, and I see a young woman skipping down the escalator at Westlake Mall.  I remember a young man, a stranger, approaching that woman, and asking her to have lunch with him, because he is so drawn to her.

Then I look in the mirror, and grieve.

I sit at my computer, and my hands begin to tingle as I type this.  Shortly they will feel numb, and I will have to stop.

I get up from the computer to walk into the living room to rest my hands.  I shuffle along, because my hips are stiff, and my legs ache.  Where is that girl with the light step, now, I wonder?

I sit down for a while, putting my feet up, to take the pressure off my knees and my hips.  I can’t knit, because that hurts, too.

I try to relax, and I have stabbing pains in my heel, I assume from neuropathy.

I am disabled.  But I am glad to be alive.

When I was receiving the chemo dose of taxol at the halfway point, my oncology nurse commented, “You’re at the top of the mountain!”  Looking back on that, I can see now that she meant we were at the zenith, so to speak, of my chemotherapy regimen with taxol, and I could begin the countdown to the last one.  Which is something to celebrate, even though I still had 6 more weeks to go, and nothing had changed about my situation at that moment.

At the time, I was thinking “Yay!  All down hill from here!”  Never having climbed to the top of a mountain, I of course knew nothing about what it actually might take to come down off the mountain.  I was all about “Yes!  We made it to the top!”  Little did I consider that coming down the mountain is just as hard and treacherous as climbing up.  Perhaps more treacherous, as you are moving in the same direction as gravity coming down, and your chances of falling on your ass increase as a result.  Still, I’m no quitter, so I’ll just keep on truckin’ cause I sure do want to get off this freaking mountain.  I didn’t want to climb it in the first place, but I got chased up here by that damn tumor, so it was climb or perish and here we are.  Now I get to pick my way down, oh-so-carefully, and I already know I will not reach the bottom unscathed.  I have quite a collection of bumps, bruises, and boo-boos already, and the big finale still to come.

Just when I learned to take certain things for granted, like putting on or taking off a shirt over my head.

Port is coming out today!

After 20 weeks of chemo, 6 weeks of radiation, and a few weeks rest break, my beloved little purple port is coming out today.

Halleluiah!